Baseball players want the judges in the game were robots

0
97
views
<pre>Baseball players want the judges in the game were robots

The sports world dealt with the human error of the referee, arbitrators and judges for dozens of years – for the most part, it has already become a tradition. But with the advent of technologies that can evaluate the game more accurately, some athletes are ready to remove people who call bolas and strikes for the field, replacing them with robots.

On Tuesday, the second Chicago Cubs baseball player Ben Zobrist, one of the most high-profile supporters of the translation baseball rules to the software court, used the dispute with the ampire (so called referees in baseball) as an excuse to advocate for changes in the league.

“That's why we need an electronic strike zone,” Zobrist commented. And along with this commentary, a long-standing debate about automation in sports erupted.

A difficult choice for athletes: automation or human error?

Out! When people watch baseball on TV – and in America it's a very popular sport – graphics are often imposed on an action that is shown in real time: pitch (pitch) becomes a bolt or strike. But judge people still give signals to the field, based on what they saw. More and more, viewers and players are in favor of giving the right to judge technology.

Speaking of opponents, Jason Gay wrote in the Wall Street Journal:

“Humanity – and all its shortcomings – is an integral part of the sport, even when this means that judges make costly mistakes. Instant repetitions have their advantages, but they turn the game into a dull tug. “

What will be the solution? An example of baseball can be professional tennis. Instead of dismissing all the judges, it was decided to encourage people and software cooperation and launch the Hawk-Eye program, which will deal with controversial decisions. The program is fast and accurate and even received the approval of the crowd. If baseball finds a similar system, traditionalists and technology fans will go hand in hand.


Source link